National Poetry Month 2018

Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links. In case you didn’t know, April was National Poetry Month in the States. This year, same as last, I decided to celebrate by posting a different poem every day on Twitter. My post collecting all of last year’s poems got a great response, so here I am again withContinue reading “National Poetry Month 2018”

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Literary Rediscoveries of 2017

These lists just keep getting longer! Per usual for this time of year, here’s a list of classic literary paraphernalia that was released or rediscovered for the first time this year. I’ve tried to make it as complete as possible, but if you know of any other previously “lost” works that were found or published this year, let me know in the comments.

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Bookish Links — October 2017

By now, you’ve probably heard about Jill Bialosky’s memoir Poetry Will Save Your Life, for which she “borrowed” paragraphs from several other sources. By far, the best take on this whole debacle has come from Talya Zax at Forward. (HT: A. M. Juster) “Poetry is another level of complexity—communities creating a higher level of meaningContinue reading “Bookish Links — October 2017”

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A Few Words about First Lines

I’m still reading Anna Karenina, which, as you may know, contains one of the most famous opening lines in the history of literature: Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. That got me thinking about other opening lines that I especially like, and before long, I had aContinue reading “A Few Words about First Lines”

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Why Macbeth‘s Birnam Wood Prophecy Actually Works

In case I hadn’t mentioned it here before, I love Macbeth. Passionately. It’s my favorite Shakespeare play (other than Hamlet) and its main character is one of my favorite protagonists in all of literature. In spite of that, I can understand why a lot of people dislike it: it’s pretty dark and violent, even forContinue reading “Why Macbeth‘s Birnam Wood Prophecy Actually Works”

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National Poetry Month Wrap-Up

April, in case you didn’t know, was National Poetry Month. I’m afraid I only remembered that on March 31, so I didn’t have time to prepare much in the way of poetry-related blog posts. So instead, I decided to tweet a poem every day in April. Here’s the full list: April 1: “The Windhover” byContinue reading “National Poetry Month Wrap-Up”

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Bookish Links — April 2017

Since I was trying to keep up the Irish literature theme for last month’s “Bookish Links,” I missed a lot of cool things that went up in March. For instance, March 1 was Robert Lowell’s 100th birthday, so the folks at the Poetry Foundation put together this podcast interviewing former students from Lowell’s poetry classesContinue reading “Bookish Links — April 2017”

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Bookish Links — January 2017

Here’s a fascinating article about how William Shakespeare’s quest for his own coat of arms may help prove his identity. An interview with Ron Padgett, who collaborated with director Jim Jarmusch to write the poems at the center of Jarmusch’s new film Paterson. Here’s something I had never heard of before: W. B. Yeats’s experimentsContinue reading “Bookish Links — January 2017”

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Favorite Books of 2016

Two-and-a-half years after starting this site, I figure it’s time I get my blogging act together and start a regular, end-of-the-year wrap-up series. I’m afraid I can’t provide you with a grand total of books I read in 2016, A) because I wasn’t keeping track and B) because whatever the final tally is, I’m sureContinue reading “Favorite Books of 2016”

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Bookish Links — December 2016

In this article from Harper’s, Annie Dillard reflects on a lifetime of receiving fan mail from many, um, special people. Given my newfound interest in “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” I’ve found it much easier to appreciate this essay by Karen Swallow Prior on “When T. S. Eliot Invented the Hipster.” From theContinue reading “Bookish Links — December 2016”

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Bookish Links — October 2016

Good news for T. S. Eliot fans: Eliot’s estate, working with his publisher Faber and Faber, has launched a new website hosting previously-unpublished letters and photos, as well as rarely-seen essays by Eliot. (HT: The Guardian) For those like myself who would have loved to go to Dana Gioia’s poetry reading in New York earlier thisContinue reading “Bookish Links — October 2016”

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Bookish Links — September 2016

One of the many odd questions that often occurs to me while I’m reading is “How old is [insert character’s name here]?” So I was excited to find this article by an Oxford English professor explaining how he figures (Hamlet’s age. (Hint: it’s not thirty.) My other favorite article this month was this piece by Austin Allen forContinue reading “Bookish Links — September 2016”

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