Literary Rediscoveries of 2017

These lists just keep getting longer! Per usual for this time of year, here’s a list of classic literary paraphernalia that was released or rediscovered for the first time this year. I’ve tried to make it as complete as possible, but if you know of any other previously “lost” works that were found or published this year, let me know in the comments.

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Bookish Links — June 2017

Rain Taxi magazine has one of the last interviews Derek Walcott gave before he died. He and interviewer Michael Swingen talked about Hart Crane for most of it, so there’s some fascinating analysis there. This month, there was a ton of articles about Gwendolyn Brooks, for the occasion of her 100th birthday (I wrote oneContinue reading “Bookish Links — June 2017”

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Bookish Links — February 2017

The Atlantic ran a wonderful story about Father Columba Stewart, an American Benedictine monk who travels all over Asia and Africa to find and digitize manuscripts that might otherwise be lost to ISIS. This is a beautiful essay about how words, poetry, and tradition can anchor us during turbulent times, with a neat little digressionContinue reading “Bookish Links — February 2017”

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Bookish Links — December 2016

In this article from Harper’s, Annie Dillard reflects on a lifetime of receiving fan mail from many, um, special people. Given my newfound interest in “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” I’ve found it much easier to appreciate this essay by Karen Swallow Prior on “When T. S. Eliot Invented the Hipster.” From theContinue reading “Bookish Links — December 2016”

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Rating Readings of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”

Despite whatever I might have said about it in previous blog posts, I’ve taken quite a liking to T. S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” Things have changed and where I once saw a vague jumble of modernist ramblings, I now see a brilliant piece of verse. A big part of whatContinue reading “Rating Readings of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock””

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Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books from My TBR List

Top Ten Tuesdays is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. As you may know, I keep a long, long, long list of books that I hope to read at some point in the future. And with this week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic being “Ten Books I’ve Added To My To-Be-Read ListContinue reading “Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books from My TBR List”

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Bookish Links — October 2016

Good news for T. S. Eliot fans: Eliot’s estate, working with his publisher Faber and Faber, has launched a new website hosting previously-unpublished letters and photos, as well as rarely-seen essays by Eliot. (HT: The Guardian) For those like myself who would have loved to go to Dana Gioia’s poetry reading in New York earlier thisContinue reading “Bookish Links — October 2016”

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Autumn Book Haul

It’s that time of year again: our local library’s semi-annual book sale just passed and as usual, I came away with a huge stack of books. Here’s a quick list of them: do let me know if you’ve read any of them and what you thought! Murder in the Cathedral by T. S. Eliot –Continue reading “Autumn Book Haul”

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The Poetry Month Tag

In case you haven’t heard, April is National Poetry Month! I’m excited, of course, and even more so because several of my favorite bloggers have already done and are planning lots of poetry-related posts this month. One of those bloggers is “Hamlette” of The Edge of the Precipice, who made up this little tag asContinue reading “The Poetry Month Tag”

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100 Facts about Charles Williams

Last week, the first full-length biography of novelist, poet, and Inkling Charles Williams sprung on the literary world (in Great Britain; the US release date is scheduled for December 29). Leading up to the book’s release, its author Grevel Lindop tweeted a fact about Charles Williams every day for 100 days. Because I know aContinue reading “100 Facts about Charles Williams”

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The “Eminently Combustible” Mister Williams

Because C. S. Lewis is too mainstream . . . . Most book geeks are well-acquainted with the name of The Inklings, the Oxford-based writers’ club founded by C. S. Lewis and attended by J. R. R. Tolkien which served as a crucible for some of the twentieth century’s greatest works of fantasy literature. ThroughoutContinue reading “The “Eminently Combustible” Mister Williams”

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Current Reads: A Lazy Post

I’m afraid I’ve been a little stuck for post ideas lately. I have a few ideas in mind, but all of them require lots of research and finishing lengthy books, so those will be long in coming. In the meantime, I give you a smattering of random thoughts on my current reads. Please excuse thisContinue reading “Current Reads: A Lazy Post”

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