Favorite Books of 2018

Hello there! Long time, no see. I apologize for the silence on this site for the past few weeks. I’ve been trying to explore other avenues for my writing, so I haven’t had as much time to write here. But since we are in the last few weeks of 2018, I thought I’d go downContinue reading “Favorite Books of 2018”

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Bookish Links — June 2018

Joy Clarkson, of the podcast Speaking with Joy, is running an online book club for C. S. Lewis’s The Great Divorce! We’re five chapters in already, but the chapters are short so there’s time to catch up. More info here. Just in time for Bloomsday, The New York Times dropped this longform article about anContinue reading “Bookish Links — June 2018”

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Bookish Links — May 2018

“In Brodsky’s view, politics was one level of human existence, but it was a low rung. The business of poetry, he thought, is to ‘indicate something more … the size of the whole ladder.’ He held that ‘art is not a better, but an alternative existence … not an attempt to escape reality but theContinue reading “Bookish Links — May 2018”

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“Like a breath of wind over my soul”: Thoughts on Chekhov’s “The Beauties”

For a number of reasons, my reading lately has tended away from fiction. Where I used to breeze through a new novel at least every month, now I’m struggling to finish the ones I start. I’m too easily distracted by all the new poetry and nonfiction that I want to read instead. But one fictionContinue reading ““Like a breath of wind over my soul”: Thoughts on Chekhov’s “The Beauties””

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Poems for Valentine’s Day

Regardless of how you feel about the holiday in general, I hope that you won’t mind looking over some rather incredible poems on the subject of love.

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Bookish Links — January 2018

“Dostoevsky’s gateless fortress also reminds us that, as a trained draughtsman, he thought in images no less than in words”: on the drawings and calligraphic scribbles that cover Fyodor Dostoevsky’s manuscripts.

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The 12 Days of Litmas (All in One Day)

If you’ve been on BookTube recently, you probably heard about the “12 Days of Litmas,” created by Adrian at Stripped Cover Lit. Unfortunately, I didn’t find out about it until it was already underway, at which point I thought it would be awkward to join in when I would be two days behind everyone else. So instead, we close out the year at Book Geeks Anonymous by answering each of Adrian’s 12 prompts today.

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Favorite Books of 2017

This post contains affiliate links. As we near the end of 2017, I thought I’d take this Wednesday to look back over a few of the books that I especially loved this year. Just like last year, I’ll be choosing one work from each of the four main genres. Favorite Fiction This year’s big fictionContinue reading “Favorite Books of 2017”

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Fall Library Sale

It’s that time of year again! Our local library recently had its semi-annual used book sale. Usually, I’ll pick up ten or twelve books at these things—this time, I got 27. Anyhow . . . A quick disclaimer: the links to the Book Depository are affiliate links. The Amazon links, however, are not. A fewContinue reading “Fall Library Sale”

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Book Review: The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov

Translator: Constance Garnett Original Language: Russian Year of First Publication: 1917 Year of Publication for This Edition: 2004 Number of Pages: N/A Publisher: Project Gutenberg Genre: Fiction A few weeks ago, I read my first Chekhov play, Uncle Vanya. I liked it so much, that I decided to read some of Chekhov’s short stories asContinue reading “Book Review: The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov”

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Bookish Links — September 2017

Here, classicist and translator Mary Beard answers that fool from The Guardian who thinks that learning foreign languages is useless. In honor of John Ashbery’s recent passing, Andrew Epstein from Locus Solus posted this about the time Ashbery sat for one of Andy Warhol’s “Screen Tests.” While we’re talking about Ashbery, here’s an article fromContinue reading “Bookish Links — September 2017”

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Book Review: First Love by Ivan Turgenev

I’m on a bit of Russian literature kick lately. Maybe you noticed. After sampling a bit from Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov, I next set my sights on Turgenev, having heard him described as one of the greatest Russian novelists who ever lived. The first thing I read from him, though, was not a novel but a novella. There’s apparently some division among book bloggers as to the worth of the novella as a form: while many people prefer the shorter format that eats up less time than novels do, others find novellas too brief to allow the reader to form an attachment to the characters. I for one love novellas, and especially ones like this, that, for all their brevity, still have you feeling with, and hurting for, the characters.

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Is this just fantasy?

I love the movies, which is why I like to blame them for everything.

Citations orthodoxes

I cannot live without books. - Thomas Jefferson

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