Favorite Books of 2019

Hello. It’s been … a while. For several reasons, I stepped away from this blog a little over a year ago, and I don’t expect to return to regular posting any time soon since I’m currently making arrangements to go to school in 2020. But I don’t want to let this space go entirely silentContinue reading “Favorite Books of 2019”

Rate this:

Book Review: The Great Divorce by C. S. Lewis

I glanced round the bus. Though the windows were closed, and soon muffed, the bus was full of light. It was a cruel light. I shrank from the faces and forms by which I was surrounded. They were all fixed faces, full not of possibilities but of impossibilities, some gaunt, some bloated, some glaring with idiotic ferocity, some drowned beyond recovery in dreams; but all, in one way or another, distorted and faded. One had a feeling that they might fall to pieces at any moment if the light grew much stronger. Then—there was a mirror on the end wall of the bus—I caught sight of my own.

And still the light grew.

And still the light grew.

Rate this:

“Like a breath of wind over my soul”: Thoughts on Chekhov’s “The Beauties”

For a number of reasons, my reading lately has tended away from fiction. Where I used to breeze through a new novel at least every month, now I’m struggling to finish the ones I start. I’m too easily distracted by all the new poetry and nonfiction that I want to read instead. But one fictionContinue reading ““Like a breath of wind over my soul”: Thoughts on Chekhov’s “The Beauties””

Rate this:

Literary Rediscoveries of 2017

These lists just keep getting longer! Per usual for this time of year, here’s a list of classic literary paraphernalia that was released or rediscovered for the first time this year. I’ve tried to make it as complete as possible, but if you know of any other previously “lost” works that were found or published this year, let me know in the comments.

Rate this:

First Impressions: Madame Bovary

At night, when the carriers passed under her windows in their carts singing the “Marjolaine,” she awoke, and listened to the noise of the iron-bound wheels, which, as they gained the country road, was soon deadened by the soil. “They will be here tomorrow!” she said to herself. And she followed them in thought upContinue reading “First Impressions: Madame Bovary”

Rate this:

Fall Library Sale

It’s that time of year again! Our local library recently had its semi-annual used book sale. Usually, I’ll pick up ten or twelve books at these things—this time, I got 27. Anyhow . . . A quick disclaimer: the links to the Book Depository are affiliate links. The Amazon links, however, are not. A fewContinue reading “Fall Library Sale”

Rate this:

Book Review: The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov

Translator: Constance Garnett Original Language: Russian Year of First Publication: 1917 Year of Publication for This Edition: 2004 Number of Pages: N/A Publisher: Project Gutenberg Genre: Fiction A few weeks ago, I read my first Chekhov play, Uncle Vanya. I liked it so much, that I decided to read some of Chekhov’s short stories asContinue reading “Book Review: The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov”

Rate this:

Book Review: First Love by Ivan Turgenev

I’m on a bit of Russian literature kick lately. Maybe you noticed. After sampling a bit from Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov, I next set my sights on Turgenev, having heard him described as one of the greatest Russian novelists who ever lived. The first thing I read from him, though, was not a novel but a novella. There’s apparently some division among book bloggers as to the worth of the novella as a form: while many people prefer the shorter format that eats up less time than novels do, others find novellas too brief to allow the reader to form an attachment to the characters. I for one love novellas, and especially ones like this, that, for all their brevity, still have you feeling with, and hurting for, the characters.

Rate this:

The Best Books I’ve Read in the Last Year

This list started with a question asked on Twitter: Best book you've read in the last 12 months – ready, go. — Barnabas Piper (@BarnabasPiper) July 28, 2017 I chimed in with my response, but today, I thought I’d elaborate on the answers I gave. And because I found it too hard to pick onlyContinue reading “The Best Books I’ve Read in the Last Year”

Rate this:

Current Reads, Part III

It appears reading has taken up most of my blogging time lately. That being the case, I thought this week I’d tell you a bit about those books that are keeping me from writing. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë It’s been a while since I invested some time in a great classic novel. I’m onlyContinue reading “Current Reads, Part III”

Rate this:

Spring Library Sale Haul

As has become a biannual tradition, I recently went to a used book sale that one of the local public libraries hosted. You know the kind: where nearly everything is $4 or less so you come away with an armful of books, blowing up your TBR in the process. Here’s what I got: 1: TheContinue reading “Spring Library Sale Haul”

Rate this:

Book Review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

For as long as I can remember, I’ve loved the Greek myths. What began as a school assignment quickly turned into a passion as I began to learn more and more about the classical world. I dabbled a little in other mythologies (mostly Egyptian and Irish), but as far as I was concerned, nothing could match the beauty and the grandeur of the Greek stories.

I still stand by that, but I’m now finding out that the Norse myths are a lot of fun too.

Rate this:

Is this just fantasy?

I love the movies, which is why I like to blame them for everything.

Citations orthodoxes

I cannot live without books. - Thomas Jefferson

#womensart ♀

Celebrating women's art and creativity

The Blonde at the Film

a fresh look at old films

Patrick Nabarro

Writer, Cinephile

Slices of Cake

watchin' all the movies, drinkin' all the smoothies (WARNING: all entries SPOILER-HEAVY)

Celluloid Wicker Man

Reviews, Essays and Analysis of Film and Art By Adam Scovell

My Crash Course

I cannot live without books. - Thomas Jefferson

Self-Styled Siren

I cannot live without books. - Thomas Jefferson

Jasmine L Holmes

Become Known & Loved

The Sheila Variations

I cannot live without books. - Thomas Jefferson

Carrots for Michaelmas

Cultivating a Catholic family through literature, liturgical living, and urban homesteading

Cinema Sojourns

Time Tripping Through the World of Film

Knowledge Lost

An Endless Pursuit of Knowledge

The Motion Pictures

Lindsey D.'s ramblings on the moving image!

FatherJustinsBlog

I cannot live without books. - Thomas Jefferson

DevenirPolyglotte

Suivez-moi au monde des langues!

Consulting Philologist

The Website and Blog of Dr. Matthew Scarborough