Favorite Books of 2019

Hello. It’s been … a while. For several reasons, I stepped away from this blog a little over a year ago, and I don’t expect to return to regular posting any time soon since I’m currently making arrangements to go to school in 2020. But I don’t want to let this space go entirely silentContinue reading “Favorite Books of 2019”

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Book Review: The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares

Translator: Ruth L. C. Simms Original Language: Spanish Year of First Publication: 1940 Year of Publication for This Edition: 2003 Number of Pages: 103 Publisher: The New York Review of Books Genre: Fiction Sub-genre: Fantasy Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links. While reading things by and about Jorge Luis Borges, the name Adolfo Bioy CasaresContinue reading “Book Review: The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares”

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Book Review: Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges

Translators: James E. Irby, Donald A. Yates, John Fine, Harriet de Onís, Julian Palley, Dudley Fitts, L. A. Murillo, and Anthony Kerrigan Original Language: Spanish Year of First Publication: 1962 Year of Publication for This Edition: 2007 Number of Pages: 256 Publisher: New Directions Genre: Fiction and nonfiction Sub-genre: Fantasy, short stories, essays Disclosure: thisContinue reading “Book Review: Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges”

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Book Review: The Great Divorce by C. S. Lewis

I glanced round the bus. Though the windows were closed, and soon muffed, the bus was full of light. It was a cruel light. I shrank from the faces and forms by which I was surrounded. They were all fixed faces, full not of possibilities but of impossibilities, some gaunt, some bloated, some glaring with idiotic ferocity, some drowned beyond recovery in dreams; but all, in one way or another, distorted and faded. One had a feeling that they might fall to pieces at any moment if the light grew much stronger. Then—there was a mirror on the end wall of the bus—I caught sight of my own.

And still the light grew.

And still the light grew.

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Book Review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

For as long as I can remember, I’ve loved the Greek myths. What began as a school assignment quickly turned into a passion as I began to learn more and more about the classical world. I dabbled a little in other mythologies (mostly Egyptian and Irish), but as far as I was concerned, nothing could match the beauty and the grandeur of the Greek stories.

I still stand by that, but I’m now finding out that the Norse myths are a lot of fun too.

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Book Review: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

This is one of those books that I bought and then stuck in my bedroom somewhere, never to be seen again until several months later when I finally decided to read it. I have no idea what took me so long. I mean, I had read Gaiman’s short stories before, so I knew him to be more than capable of creating mind-bending fantasy worlds, or a real-world story teeming with dread, or a very simple story that nevertheless breaks your heart. So I shouldn’t have been surprised when he did all three at once.

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Bookish Links—July 2016

Just before the great Elie Wiesel passed away earlier this month, the magazine Tablet posted this essay about Wiesel’s little-known articles for the Yiddish newspaper The Forverts, articles in which he describes, among other things, his first impressions of the American west and his first trip to Disneyland. (HT: The Paris Review.) Following the publication last MayContinue reading “Bookish Links—July 2016”

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Literary Rediscoveries of 2015

It’s not easy being a classic lit fan: besides having to deal with the rarity of some books, we also miss out on the elation other bookworms feel as they anticipate their favorite author’s next release. Since most of our favorite authors are dead (or just refuse to publish again for years), we’ll never getContinue reading “Literary Rediscoveries of 2015”

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Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, Read by Neil Gaiman

As Christmas looms nearer still, I thought I’d dig up this old gem. This time last year, Neil Gaiman was asked to give a reading of Dickens’s A Christmas Carol at the New York City Public Library, using the selfsame manuscript from which Dickens himself gave readings back when. Below is a recording of thatContinue reading “Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, Read by Neil Gaiman”

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100 Facts about Charles Williams

Last week, the first full-length biography of novelist, poet, and Inkling Charles Williams sprung on the literary world (in Great Britain; the US release date is scheduled for December 29). Leading up to the book’s release, its author Grevel Lindop tweeted a fact about Charles Williams every day for 100 days. Because I know aContinue reading “100 Facts about Charles Williams”

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Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books on My Fall “To Be Read” List

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. 1 & 2: Surprised by Joy and The Weight of Glory by C. S. Lewis I bought these two on impulse about a week ago. The Weight of Glory still sits in its pretty cream-colored Barnes and Noble bag, while I’ve already startedContinue reading “Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books on My Fall “To Be Read” List”

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Book Review: War in Heaven by Charles Williams

Year of first publication: 1930 Year of publication for this edition: 2004 Number of pages: 256 Publisher: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company Genre: Fiction Sub-genres: Fantasy, Supernatural thriller Note: this post contains an affiliate link. Almost two weeks ago, I introduced you to Charles Williams, a poet, editor, novelist, and one of the principal membersContinue reading “Book Review: War in Heaven by Charles Williams”

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